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Update on the 50 book challenge

I'm a little behind schedule, but I still have hopes of making 50 by the end of the year.  Meanwhile, here's the list of books read in July and August (books 20 - 27):

Le Carré, John.  The Mission Song.  (The author's second novel set in Africa.  I'm a big fan of Le Carré's work, but this one just didn't grab and hold my attention.  Weak characters, and a thin story.  Check it out from your local library if you want to read it.)

Muir, Kate.  Left Bank.  (A very enjoyable story about a high-powered French couple with a young daughter and an English nanny.  The husband is an intellectual/writer, the wife an American film and stage actress.  The daughter has more sense than the two of them put together.)

Rowling, J. K.  Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.  (You've already heard of this one, I think.)

Rowling, J. K.  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.  (And this one as well.)

Jelinek, Elfriede.  The Piano Teacher.  (After ovedosing on back-to-back Harry Potter novels, I was looking for something intended for adults.  This Nobel-prize winner (which was turned into a film starring Isabelle Huppert) definitely filled the bill.)

George, Elizabeth.  What Came Before He Shot Her.  (A remarkable novel, and not like anything she's written before.  George's previous novel, With No One As Witness, shocked longtime fans (I won't say why; if you've read the book you already know, and if you haven't, I don't want to spoil it).  In the new book, George sets out to show how the gunshot in Witness happened.  I've always thought George was brilliant at creating rich, living, breathing characters.  She's outdone herself this time.  Highly recommended, and if you haven't read Witness, don't worry.  This one stands on its own.)

Jamison, Kay Redfield.  An Unquiet Mind.  (A nonfiction work; the author's memoir about her battle with manic-depressive illness.  What sets this apart is the fact that the author herself teaches and works in the field of mental health.)

McEwan, Ian.  Atonement.  (A novel about the consequences of a lie.  Beautifully written.)

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I originally posted this entry in the 50bookchallenge commnuity, but I want to add a couple of notes here directed at certain members of my own flist.  First, rileyc, you should definitely read the Elizabeth George novel.  I'd love to hear what you think of it.  Second, for those of you who follow French politics to any degree, go and read Kate Muir's book and then tell me if you don't think the husband in the story is modelled at least in part on Dominique de Villepin and Bernard-Henri Lévy.  *gleefully watches the expression on certain people's faces as they imagine that combination*  

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
babycakesin
Sep. 10th, 2007 02:44 pm (UTC)
the husband in the story is modelled at least in part on Dominique de Villepin and Bernard-Henri Levy
it's the hair, isn't it? *g* I'll check The Left Bank - it sounds funny.

thanks for the recs - I'm currently reading Ken Follett's Pilars of the Earth - love it so far.
aswanargent
Sep. 10th, 2007 02:54 pm (UTC)
The hair, the attitude, etc. etc. I found myself quoting passages to the girl who writes dominiquelechic because the character is just so very Dominique, lol.

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )