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SF and Fantasy Book Meme

From dargie

Bold the ones you have read, strike through the ones you read and hated, italicize those you started but never finished and put a star next to the ones you love.

1. The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien *
2. The Foundation Trilogy, Isaac Asimov *
3.
Dune, Frank Herbert
4. Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein
5.
A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin
6. Neuromancer, William Gibson
7. Childhood's End, Arthur C. Clarke *
8. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
9. The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley
10. Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
11. The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe
12. A Canticle for Leibowitz, Walter M. Miller, Jr. *
13. The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov
14. Children of the Atom, Wilmar Shiras
15. Cities in Flight, James Blish
16. The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett
17. Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
18. Deathbird Stories, Harlan Ellison
19. The Demolished Man, Alfred Bester
20. Dhalgren, Samuel R. Delany
21. Dragonflight, Anne McCaffrey
22. Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card
23. The First Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Stephen R. Donaldson
24. The Forever War, Joe Haldeman
25. Gateway, Frederik Pohl
26. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J.K. Rowling
27. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
28. I Am Legend, Richard Matheson
29. Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice

30. The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
31. Little, Big, John Crowley
32. Lord of Light, Roger Zelazny
33. The Man in the High Castle, Philip K. Dick
34. Mission of Gravity, Hal Clement
35. More Than Human, Theodore Sturgeon
36. The Rediscovery of Man, Cordwainer Smith
37. On the Beach, Nevil Shute
38. Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke
39. Ringworld, Larry Niven
40. Rogue Moon, Algis Budrys
41. The Silmarillion, J.R.R. Tolkien
42. Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut
43. Snow Crash, Neal Stephenson
44. Stand on Zanzibar, John Brunner
45. The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester
46. Starship Trooper, Robert A. Heinlein
47. Stormbringer, Michael Moorcock
48. The Sword of Shannara, Terry Brooks
49. Timescape, Gregory Benford
50. To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip Jose Farmer

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
(Deleted comment)
aswanargent
Nov. 17th, 2006 08:08 am (UTC)
I never can figure out how items make it on to lists like this.

Like you, I don't recognise a lot of these titles, and it does seem sort of an odd mixture of hard science fiction and classic fantasy, with a few other things thrown into the mix. (The Mists of Avalon?) And what about the books that were left out? Off the top of my head, I would have included Simak's Way Station, and Stapledon's Odd John and Sirius. And what about The Day of the Triffids, or the C.S. Lewis trilogy (Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength).

I wish I could bring myself to stop reading a book if I find I'm not enjoying it. Instead, I keep going, hoping against hope it will improve. As I learned to my great sorrow with Dhalgren, that doesn't usually happen. I loathed that book, but I forced myself all the way through it. I was reading it back when Bobby Sands and the other hunger strikers were dying in the Maze Prison; I'd drive to work listening to news updates on their condition, and then the day would get even better with Dhalgren at lunchtime.
(Deleted comment)
lark_about
Nov. 17th, 2006 05:40 pm (UTC)
Dargie you are a Heroes/Hiro fan? Me too!

Karen, I can't believe you never read Neuromancer! I've lost count of how many times I've read it. I don't know if you would like it but it is certainly a modern classic. I can loan you a copy if you are curious.
druk_sablina
Dec. 13th, 2006 05:15 am (UTC)
Whee, a sci-fi fan! \(^0^)/ I stalked you over from Laura's journal, I hope you don't mind.

Even though I've not read a lot on the list, I'll second that it's a bit of an eclectic collection, especially with Terry Pratchett thrown in there. And that perhaps one or two others could feature - what about Orson Wells? Huxley (if he counts as strictly sci-fi)?

If I could recommend anything (trying to base it on what I know of what you've read), I would definitely point to anything by Phillip K. Dick, and if you like you science/fantasy funny, Pratchett and Adams. Oh and if you particularly liked Bradbury, I'm told that one of his best collections is Golden Apples of the Sun, but hard to find (in Australia, anyway).

Now I'm stealing your list, if that's quite all right. And sorry about the long post ^_^;;
aswanargent
Dec. 13th, 2006 06:45 pm (UTC)
Hi! Welcome! I knew I recognised your username, but couldn't think where until you mentioned Laura. :-)

I expect I've read Dick at some point (I've certainly seen films based on his works), but don't recall titles off the top of my head. Re funny fantasy/science fiction, no, that probably wouldn't appeal.

*sigh* I don't read nearly as many books (of any stripe) as I used to. I blame it on finally getting a laptop this summer with built-in wireless access. So my daily commute (around three hours total) by bus is now usually spent going online instead of reading books. :-(

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )